Accueil du site pour apprendre le français Créer un test / 1 leçon par semaine
Connectez-vous !

Cliquez ici pour vous connecter
Nouveau compte
4 millions de comptes créés

100% gratuit !
[Avantages]

  • Accueil
  • Accès rapides
  • Imprimer
  • Livre d'or
  • Plan du site
  • Recommander
  • Signaler un bug
  • Faire un lien

  • Comme des milliers de personnes, recevez gratuitement chaque semaine une leçon de français !





    > Publicités :




    > Recommandés:
    -Jeux gratuits
    -Nos autres sites
       



    Rack your Brains and Help/80

    Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

    [POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


    Rack your Brains and Help/80
    Message de here4u posté le 12-10-2020 à 00:05:22 (S | E | F)
    Hello, Dear Workers,

    Vous noterez que je continue mon effort pour vous donner des textes courts ...
    Petite "réflexion" sur la langue cette fois ... Un peu abstrait pour my poor Student, peut-être, mais vous allez l'aider, j'en suis certaine !
    PLEASE, HELP MY STUDENT! Malgré ses GROS efforts, il reste 16 fautes dans son texte ... Merci de l'aider à les corriger EN LETTRES CAPITALES. Il compte sur vous, et moi aussi ...
    Ce texte est bien un et la correction sera en ligne le mercredi 28 octobre en soirée.

    ATTENTION Bien lire l’intervention ci-dessous du 15/10 AVANT de vous lancer dans la recherche des fautes !

    Why wouldn’t an English-speaker never dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig? Confused? The answer lays in an unofficial «law» of language. English has no government – nobody or academy dictating its rules or development. But sometimes, we come against a curious ‘law’ that has been past not by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the technic name of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’(as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff’. /// END of Part ONE /// No native speaker of English, would never dally-dilly or shally-shilly on his way to a song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor would we never walk in a zag-zig to a saw-see, have a chat-chit during eating a Kat-Kit, or play a game of pong-ping. Even when the expression has three elements, the rule stands: bash-bosh-bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney-meeny-mo sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The Japaneses have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry leafs) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch ('fiddlesticks'), a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and there’s another!). ///END of Part TWO ///
    We’ve all been doing this since centuries, yet the reason ablaut reduplication exists has never been fully nailed down. Sound is definitively key- when we produce an ‘i’ or ‘e’, we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ‘o’ pushes it lower. This high vowel low vowel sequence produces a pleasing rythm, even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating pirrodge for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we ever need to know what we don’t know; we just… know it! ///END of Text ///

    I give you THE FORCE!



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de joe39, postée le 13-10-2020 à 11:59:22 (S | E)
    Hello dear here4u,
    After a bish-bash-bosh errors detection and without any shilly-shally, I submit you my try, ready to be checked

    ///

    16 mistakes
    Why wouldn’t an English-speaker EVER - 1, dally-dilly or walk in zag-zig Confused? The answer IS LAID OUT - 2 in an unofficial «law» of language. English has no government – NO TEACHING BODY AND ANY-3 academy DICTATES - 4 its rules or development. But sometimes, we GO - 5 against a curious ‘law’ that has NOT BEEN PASSED – 6 by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the TECHNICAL-7 name of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’(as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff’. /// END of Part ONE /// No native speaker of English, would never dally-dilly or shally-shilly on his way to a Song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor would we never walk in a zag zig to a saw-see, have a chat- chit WHILE - 8 eating a kat-kit, or play a game of pong-ping - . even when the expression has three elements, the rule IS -9 : bash-bosh- bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney- meeny-moe sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The JAPANESE- 10 have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry LEAVES-11) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch ('fiddlesticks'), a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and there’s another ONE !). ///END of Part TWO ///
    We’ve all been doing this FOR – 12 centuries, yet the reason WHY – 13 ablaut reduplication exists has never been fully nailed down. THE - 14 Sound is definitively key- when we produce an ‘i’ or ‘e’, we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ‘o’ pushes it lower. his high vowel low vowel sequence produces a pleasing RHYTHM – 15 even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating pirrodge for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we NEVER- 16 need to know what we don’t know; we just… know it! ///END of Text ///


    I thank you for the nice exercise and remain wishing you a pleasant day.
    So long.
    Joe39



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de here4u, postée le 15-10-2020 à 10:55:51 (S | E)
    Hello !
    Les mots écrits à l’envers dans la première phrase et dans le texte NE SONT PAS CONSIDÉRÉS COMME DES FAUTES .... ( et ne sont donc pas comptés) ... Ce ne sont que des explications et illustrations de la théorie ... ( De même, inutile de chercher les mots donnés dans d‘autres langues ... Il n’y a pas de pièges ... )
    Ceci n’est pas un exercice d’écriture en «  verlan » ... mais bien un exercice de GRAMMAIRE et de vrai vocabulaire, comme toujours !



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de maxwell, postée le 18-10-2020 à 15:29:12 (S | E)
    READY TO BE CORRECTED
    Hello Here4U
    This exercise was quite destabilising, but guess what? Most of the mistakes were not hard to find... except of course those which I failed to correct
    Help Our Student:
    Why wouldn’t an English-speaker EVER dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig? Confused? The answer LIES in an unofficial «law» of language. English has no government – NO BODY or academy dictating its rules or development. But sometimes, we come UP against a curious ‘law’ that has been PASSED not by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the TECHNICAL name of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’(as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff’. /// END of Part ONE ///

     No native speaker of English would EVER dally-dilly or shally-shilly on his way to a song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor would we EVER walk in a zag-zig to a saw-see, have a chat-chit WHILE eating a Kat-Kit, or PLAYING a game of pong-ping. Even when the expression has three elements, the rule HOLDS: bash-bosh-bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney-meeny-mo  sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The JAPANESE have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry LEAVES) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch ('fiddlesticks'), OF a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and there’s another ONE!). ///END of Part TWO ///

    We’ve all been doing this FOR centuries, yet the reason WHY reduplication exists has never been fully nailed down. THE sound is definitively key- when we produce an ‘i’ or ‘e’, we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ‘o’ pushes it lower. This high vowel low vowel sequence produces a pleasing RHYTHM, even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating pirrodge for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we NEVER need to know what we don’t know; we just… know it! ///END of Text ///



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de here4u, postée le 18-10-2020 à 15:41:49 (S | E)
    Hello!

    Cet exercice ne vous semble très difficile que parce que vous vous concentrez sur les mots composés écrits à l'envers ... Ne vous LAISSEZ PAS INTIMIDER ! Ils ne comptent pas ... Passez les allègrement et vous découvrirez les "vraies" fautes qui sont très classiques ... Come on! Don't give up!



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de maya92, postée le 18-10-2020 à 16:42:20 (S | E)
    Hello Here4u,

    Why wouldn’t an English-speaker EVER dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig ? Confused? The answer LIES DOWN in an unofficial «law» of language. English has no government – nobody NOR ANY academy dictating its rules or development. But sometimes, we come UPON a curious ‘law’ that has been PASSED not by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the TECHNICAL name of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’(as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riffraff’. /// END of Part ONE //

    No native speaker of English, would EVER dally-dilly or shally-shilly on his way to a song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor would we EVER walk in a zag-zig to a saw-see, have a chat-chit WHILE eating a Kat-Kit, or play a game of pong-ping. Even when the expression has three elements, the rule stands: bash-bosh-bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney-meeny-mo sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The JAPANESE have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry LEAVES) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch ('fiddlesticks'), a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and there’s another!). ///END of Part TWO ///

    We’ve all been doing this FOR centuries, yet the reason ‘ablaut reduplication’ exists has never been fully nailed down. THE sound is definitively THE key- when we produce an ‘i’ or ‘e’, we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ‘o’ pushes it lower. This high vowel low vowel sequence produces a PLEASANT RHYTHM, even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating 'pirrodge' for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we NEVER need to know what we don’t know; we just… know it! ///END of Text ///

    Doesn't seem that hard so I guess I've forgotten a lot of mistakes (or found too many ..or not the right ones ..)
    Now good luck for the translation ..!
    Have a nice sunny Sunday



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de alpiem, postée le 18-10-2020 à 19:47:45 (S | E)
    Rack your Brains and Help/80
    hello here4u and everybody,

    Why wouldn't an English-speaker EVER dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig? Confused? The answer LIES in an
    unofficial "law" of language.
    English has no government-nobody OR academy dictating THEIR rules or THEIR development.
    But sometimes, we COME ACROSS a curious 'law' that HAS been past not by any formal authority, but by the
    speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the technic name of ‘ablaut
    reduplication."

    It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the
    ‘e’(as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff'.///
    END OF PART ONE///.

    No native speaker of English, would EVER dally-dilly or shally-shilly on his way to a song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor would we EVER walk in a zag-zig to a saw-see, have a chat-chit during eating a Kat-Kit, or play a game of pong-ping.

    Even when the expression has three elements, the rule STANDS UP : bash-bosh-bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney-meeny-mo sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The Japaneses have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry leafs) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch ('fiddlesticks'), a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and SO ON.!). ///END of Part TWO ///

    We’ve all been doing this FOR centuries, yet the reason ablaut reduplication exists has never been fully nailed down.
    Sound is definitively THE key- when we produce an ‘i’ or ‘e’, we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ‘o’ pushes it lower.
    This high vowel low vowel sequence produces a pleasing rythm, even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating pirrodge for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we NEVER need to know what we don’t know; we just… know it! ///END of Text ///



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de taiji43, postée le 19-10-2020 à 14:38:09 (S | E)
    Dear Here4U,

    thank you for your numerous explanations ...SO, I can send my correction to
    you
    READY TO BE CORRECTED

    Why wouldn’t an English-speaker EVER dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig? Confused? The answer LIES DOWN (reposer sur)an unofficial «law» of language. English has no government – NOR ANY academy dictating its rules or development. But sometimes, we come UPON (tomber sur) a curious ‘law’ that has been past not by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the TECHNICAL name of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’(as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff’. /// END of Part

    ONE /// No native speaker of English, WILL BE EVER dally-dilly or shally-shilly on his way to a song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor WILL BE we EVER walk in a zag-zig to a saw-see, have a chat-chit WHILE eating a Kat-Kit,or PLAYING a game of of ping pong. Even when the expression has three elements, the rule stands : : bash-bosh-bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney-meeny-MOE sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The JAPANESE have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry LEAVES) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch ('fiddlesticks'), a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and OF WHICH another!(de quel autre). ///END of Part TWO ///

    We’ve all been doing this since FOR centuries, yet the reason ablaut reduplication exists has never been fully nailed down. THE Sound is definitively THE key- when we produce an ‘i’ or ‘e’, we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ‘o’ pushes it lower. This high vowel low vowel sequence produces a PLEASANT RHYTHM, even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating pirrodge for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we NEVER need to know what we don’t know; we just… know it! ///END of Text ///



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de chocolatcitron, postée le 26-10-2020 à 19:13:30 (S | E)
    Rack your Brains and Help/80 mercredi 28 octobre
    Message de here4u posté le 12-10-2020 à 00:05:22 (S | E | F)
    Hello, my dear Here4u, thanks, it was tricky to work for me, but I did it after having cancel all the words written in Verlan… if not, it is really undrinkable for us, as French people with a few knowledge about so many jeu de mots in English !
    Hi Everybody!

    Ayant déjà fourni une traduction ici, je ne PARTICIPERAI PAS au follow up work. (Je vous laisse ma place... )

    Finished!


    Here is my work: 16 mistakes to be found: I give you THE FORCE!
    Why 1 WOULD an English-speaker never dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig? Confused? The answer 2 LIES in an unofficial «law» of language. English has no government – nobody or academy dictating its rules or development. But sometimes, we come 3 ACROSS a curious ‘law’ that has been 4 PASSED not by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the 5 TECHNICAL name of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’(as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff’. /// END of Part ONE /// No native speaker 6 IN English, would 7 EVER dally-dilly or shally-shilly on 8 THEIR way to a song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor would 9 US 7 BIS EVER walk in a zag-zig to a saw-see, have a chat-chit 10 WHILE eating a Kat-Kit, or play a game of pong-ping. Even when the expression has three elements, the rule stands: bash-bosh-bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney-meeny-mo sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The 11 JAPANESE have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry 12 LEAVES) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch ('fiddlesticks'), a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and there’s another!). ///END of Part TWO ///
    We’ve all been doing this 13 FOR centuries, yet the reason 14 WHY ablaut reduplication exists has never been fully nailed down. Sound is definitively 15 THE key- when we produce an ‘i’ or ‘e’, we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ‘o’ pushes it lower. This high vowel low vowel sequence produces a pleasing 16 RHYTHM, even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating pirrodge for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we ever need to know what we don’t know; we just… know it! ///END of Text ///


    Ma traduction pour essayer de comprendre quelque chose … :
    Pourquoi un anglophone ne traînasserait-il jamais, ou ne marcherait-il pas en zig-zag? Confus? La réponse tient son origine dans une « loi » officieuse de la langue. L’anglais n’a pas d’académie linguistique (plutôt que gouvernance) – personne ou académie ne dicte ses règles ou son développement. Mais parfois, nous trouvons par hasard une « loi » curieuse qui a été adoptée non pas par une autorité formelle, mais par les orateurs eux-mêmes.
    Très peu d’entre nous savons que nous suivons un ancien protocole qui porte le nom technique d’« alternance vocalique ». Il dicte que, dans toute combinaison de mots en allitération , nous mettons toujours le son «i » (comme dans « pit »( trou)), ou le «ee » (comme dans « see » (voir), d’abord, avant un « a» ou « o» - d’où « fiddle-faddle »(balivernes) , « ding-dong », et « riff raff (racaille)». END de la partie ONE ///
    Aucun locuteur natif en anglais, ne serait jamais dally-dilly (traînasserait) ou shilly-shilly (hésiterait) sur son chemin avec une singsong (voix chantante) tout en portant des flop-flips (tong). Pas plus que nous ne marcherions jamais en zag-zig (zigzag) vers un (tape-cul), avoir des chat-chit (bavardages) tout en mangeant un Kat-Kit (kitkat), ou jouer à un jeu de pong-ping (ping pong). Même lorsque l’ expression a trois éléments, on maintient la règle : bash-bosh-bish juste ne se coupe pas, et eeny-miney-meeny-mo (comptine enfantine ) sonne tout aussi faux. La même loi se trouve dans de nombreuses langues. Les Japonais ont le beau 'kasa koso' (le bruissement craquant des feuilles sèches) tandis que les Allemands pourraient parler de Quitschquatsch (balivernes), un Wirrwarr (confusion), ou de Krimskrams (babioles) (leur version du Français bric-à-brac- et il y en a une autre!). FIN de la partie DEUX ///
    Nous avons tous fait cela pendant des siècles, mais la raison pour laquelle l’alternance vocalique existe n’a jamais été entièrement résolue. Le son est définitivement la clé- lorsque nous produisons un «i » ou «ee », nous positionnons notre langue plus haut dans notre bouche, tandis que le « a» ou « o» la place plus basse. Cette séquence de voyelles basses hautes produit un rythme agréable, même si c’est celui que nous réservons surtout pour ces combinaisons ludiques - sinon nous mangerions tous du pirrodge (porridge) pour le petit déjeuner. Heureusement pour les locuteurs natifs - nous avons toujours besoin de savoir ce que nous ne savons pas; nous venons de ... le savoir! FIN du texte ///


    My explanations:
    1 WOULD an English-speaker never = on ne peut pas mettre deux négations dans la même proposition : soit “why would + never”, soit “why wouldn’t + ever”… D’après toi, cette faute est gravissime, et tu as osé nous la réécrire, rhooo ???
    2 LIES = lay laid laid = poser, pondre un oeuf… ,mais lie lay lain = venir de qqch, avoir son origine dans qqch… confusion entre les deux mots… On garde le présent simple car c’est une vérité absolue.
    3 ACROSS : To come up against = se heurter à (je ne pense pas qu’il y ait une lutte)… to come accross = trouver par hasard, tomber sur, donner le sentiment d’être...
    4 PASSED = Passed (verbe) = preterit de to pass… = passer. Past = préposition, adj, adv, nom, = passé.
    5 TECHNICAL = adj technique. Technics (avec s existe mais pas technic sans le s…
    6 IN = pas of mais : In English/French/Dutch/Italian/German, …
    7 et 7 bis = EVER = parce qu’il y a « no »/ « nor » (pour 7 bis) en début de proposition, sinon double négation !
    8 Their = pluriel général 1+1+1=une multitude. (Donc pas his).
    9 Us = complément qui est à la fois le sujet du verbe suivant… pas we !
    10 WHILE = pendant que, dans le même temps during = pendant une période donnée
    11 JAPANESE = pas de pluriel aux noms de nationalité. The English, the French…
    12 LEAVES = pluriel irrégulier de leaf.
    13 FOR = durée. Since oblige une date, un moment de départ de l’action envisagée.
    14 the reason why = la raison pour laquelle…
    15 The key.
    16 RHYTHM = rythme.

    Mots verlan (assez prise de tête, même si on peut considérer le texte amusant, dans une certaine mesure !)...
    dilly-dally = traînasser.
    Ablaut reduplication = alternance vocalique.
    Pit = fosse, trou carrière, noyau, cicatrice. Arène, bosseler.
    Hence = d’où, en conséquence
    Riff raff = racaille, populace.
    Fiddle-faddle = balivernes
    Shali shili = hésiter, tergiverser.
    Sing song = voix chantante, chanter en cœur.
    flip flops = tongs, nu-pieds.
    see saw = balançoire, tape-cul, yoyo, osciller.
    chit chat = bavardages
    kit kat = gâteau au chocolat extra plat
    bish bash bosh = masturbation, confiance en soi et fanfaronner.
    eeny- miney-meeny-mo = comptine enfantine
    kasa koso = la maison des enzymes ???
    rustling = qui bruisse
    Quitschquatsch = balivernes, conneries
    fiddlesticks = archet, du tout, balivernes
    Wirrwarr = confusion chaos.
    muddle = désordre, fouillis
    Krimskrams = babioles
    nailed down= clouer
    definitively = de façon certaine, catégorique.
    otherwise = sinon, autrement
    pirrodge = porridge

    I give you the Force, Here4u, as much as it wasn't easy. It took a long time to end it.

    Stay safe and have a very sweet week, all of You.



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de here4u, postée le 28-10-2020 à 23:03:48 (S | E)
    Hello, dear hard workers!

    Lorsque j’ai découvert ce texte (un peu originalement technique, je vous l’accorde ! surtout si l’on ne connaît pas les mots où les syllabes étaient mal placées …) je l’ai non seulement trouvé amusant, mais intéressant. Il contenait un grand nombre de négations traitées de diverses manières (interrogatives/ avec la négation en début de phrase/ avec un adverbe négatif/ neither … nor/ etc.) J’ai donc décidé de faire porter plusieurs fautes de mon Student sur ces négations pour lesquelles vous avez parfois des difficultés, lorsqu’elles sont bien intégrées dans les phrases et demandent une réflexion … ou de bons réflexes !
    Il ne fallait pas vous focaliser sur ces mots, déjà assez rares, aux sonorités étranges, puisqu'ils étaient écrits "à l'envers" pour démontrer la théorie exposée. Voici donc votre correction :

    Why would (1) an English-speaker never dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig ? Confused ? The answer lies (2) in an unofficial « law » of language. English has no government – no body (3) or academy dictating its rules or development. But sometimes, we come across (4) a curious ‘law’ that has been passed (5) not by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the technical name (6) of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’ (as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff’. /// END of Part ONE /// No native speaker of English, would ever (7) dally-dilly or shally-shilly on their way (8) to a song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor would we ever walk (9) in a zag-zig to a saw-see, have a chat-chit while eating (10) a Kat-Kit, or play a game of pong-ping. Even when the expression has three elements, the rule stands: bash-bosh-bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney-meeny-mo sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The Japanese (11) have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry leaves (12) ) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch (‘fiddlesticks‘), a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and there’s another !). ///END of Part TWO ///
    We’ve all been doing this for centuries (13), yet the reason ablaut reduplication exists has never been fully nailed down. Sound is definitely (14) key- when we produce an ‘i’ or ‘e’, we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ’o’ pushes it lower. This high vowel low vowel sequence produces a pleasing rhythm (15), even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating pirrodge for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we never need (16) to know what we don’t know ; we just… know it ! ///END of Text ///

    Just for the fun of it: words written « en verlan » (backward-slang/ pig latin) : dont les syllabes étaient inversées … Je vous les donne dans le bon sens !

    - To dilly-dally= delay, dawdle : traîner, tergiverser, lambiner.
    - Zigzag
    - To shilly-shally= be indecisive= hésiter, tergiverser.
    - Fiddle-faddle (nonsense, gibberish) = des balivernes.
    - Ding-dong
    - Kit-Kat
    - A sing-song voice= voix chantante/ to have a sing-song= chanter en chœur.
    - Riffraff/ riff-raff= la racaille, la populace.
    - A seesaw/ a teeter-totter(US)// a see-saw(GB)= une balançoire à bascule (un « tape-cul » !)
    - A chit-chat (GB)/ a chitchat(US) = un bavardage, un papotage, des jacasseries.
    - fiddlesticks : balivernes, (interjection expressing frustration, dismissing as nonsense).
    - Lien internet
    : the child decision-making device known as "Eeny meeny miney moe, catch a tiger by the toe. If he hollers, let him go, eeny meeny miney moe"? something like "Pique et pique et colegram, bour et bour et ratatam, am stram gram, pouce dam !..."
    - bish-bash-bosh= Lien internet



    (1) Why would(n’t an English-speaker never = double négation ! C’est une horreur impossible ! Le sens de la phrase ne rendait pas possible la négation associée à l’auxiliaire. Il fallait donc la supprimer mais conserver "never".
    (2) The answer lays : The answer lies ; confusion des verbes irréguliers "to lie, I lay, lain" et "to lay, I laid, laid".
    (3) nobody= no body= a group or organization: (Lien internet

    (4) we come against a curious ‘law’=> we come across … = we meet!
    (5) has been past/ « past » est un adjectif, une préposition, ou ici, un nom=> "the past". "Has been passed"= participe passé.
    (6) the technic name=> the technical name
    (7) «No native speaker of English, would never… »=> encore une double négation ! IMPOSSIBLE !
    (8) No native speaker of English, would ever « dally-dilly » or « shally-shilly » on their way : No native = 3è personne indéfinie (Somebody/ anybody/ nobody/a person…)=> le pronom qui l’accompagne doit être au pluriel.
    (9) Nor would we ever walk: ici, inversion du sujet après la reprise négative « nor » : No native speaker … nor would we= Neither any native speaker would ever …nor would they … // Reprise à nouveau d’une double négation… (Toujours IMPOSSIBLE !)
    (10) (during eating[ eating n’est pas un NOM = during impossible ; during the meal.]=> while eating.(= while we were eating) Tout comme "during", "while" sert à mettre deux événements en parallèle. Cependant, contrairement à "during" qui sera toujours suivi d'un nom, "while" s'utilisera lui avec une phrase complète (sujet + verbe).
    (11) The Japanese: Lien internet
    (Ca fait deux fois de suite que mon élève fait la faute ! )
    (12) of dry leaves: Lien internet
    Leçon à revoir...
    (13) this since centuries=> for centuries (since + point de départ d’une action, ou date précise// for + durée. )
    (14) "Sound is definitely..." (Lien internet
    /// Lien internet
    . Bien noter la différence entre les deux mots ! (definitely//definitively)
    (15) Noter aussi l’orthographe de « rythme= fr »=> English= RHYTHM.
    (16) we never need to know what we don’t know : nous verrons comment vous traduirez cette expression en français ...

    C'était ma transition pour vous solliciter en tant que "volontaires traducteurs" . Nous avons déjà un exemplaire de version pour le Follow up work, puisque notre Choco nous l'a donnée en même temps que sa correction (en affirmant qu'elle ne la ferait pas !) J'attends donc une ou deux traductions partielles ... du texte et vous fais confiance, bien que le travail ne soit pas facile .. .
    Bravo à tous ceux qui ont osé faire ce "casse-tête"... ... Je sais que certains l'ont fait "à reculons"! et je les en remercie d'autant plus ... Vou vous en êtes très bien tirés et avez donc eu raison de dépasser votre hésitation ...
    Une nouvelle fois, I give you THE FORCE!



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de magie8, postée le 29-10-2020 à 10:15:00 (S | E)
    hello , je vais bien la santé est bonne pour l instant, je l'espère de même aussi pour vous tous . j essaie de traduire la 1ere partie de ce texte que je ne comprends pas vraiment bien! aussi laissez moi un peu de temps je m'y accroche à bientôt magie


    Why would (1) an English-speaker never dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig ? Confused ? The answer lies (2) in an unofficial « law » of language. English has no government – no body (3) or academy dictating its rules or development. But sometimes, we come across (4) a curious ‘law’ that has been passed (5) not by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the technical name (6) of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’ (as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff’. /// END

    Pourquoi un anglophone ne tergiverserait jamais ou ne marcherait pas en zig-zag? Confus?La réponse réside dans une "loi" non officielle du langage.La langue anglaise n'a pas de directive,ni de structure ou d'académie qui dicte ses règles ou son développement.Mais parfois nous rencontrons une curieuse "loi"qui a été votée non par une autorité formelle mais par les orateurs eux-mêmes.
    Très peu d'entre nous savent que nous suivons un ancien protocole qui porte le nom technique de "reduplication" .Il dicte que dans n'importe quelle combinaison de mots répétés ,nous mettons toujours le son "i" comme dans "pit"(trou, fosse)ou le 'e' comme dans (see)d'abord devant un'a' ou un'o'- d'où fiddle-faddle(balivernes)"ding-dong" et "riff-raff"(racaille).

    j'espère m'en être pas trop mal sortie j ai fait ce que j'ai pu!



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de here4u, postée le 29-10-2020 à 16:12:31 (S | E)
    Hello!

    J'ai oublié de spécifier hier dans le corrigé, que le Follow Up Work n'était (comme à chaque fois) PAS URGENT. Là, je dois me concentrer sur les autres exercices à échéance ... A lot of work... Take your time, Magie... and thank you!



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de maxwell, postée le 31-10-2020 à 09:16:24 (S | E)
    FINISHED

    Hello! Ce n'était pas facile, j'ai essayé d'être créatif ...
    Follow_up work:
    Part I:
    Why would an English-speaker never dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig ? Confused ? The answer lies in an unofficial « law » of language. English has no government – no body or academy dictating its rules or development. But sometimes, we come across a curious ‘law’ that has been passed not by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the technical name of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’ (as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff’. 

    Pourquoi un anglophone ne pourrait-il pas ner-traî, marcher en zag-zig ? Un peu perdu ? La réponse se trouve dans une "loi" non officielle de la langue. L'anglais n'as pas de gouvernement - aucun organisme ou académie ne dictant ses règles ou son développement. Mais quelquefois, nous rencontrons une curieuse "loi" qui a été adoptée non pas par une autorité officielle mais par les locuteurs eux-mêmes. Très peu d'entre nous savent que nous suivons un protocole ancien qui est connu sous le nom technique de réduplication partielle à alternance vocalique. Elle impose que, dans toute combinaison de mots qui se répète, nous mettions toujours le son 'i' (comme dans 'pit') ou le 'e' (comme dans 'see') en premier, avant un 'a' ou un 'o' -d'où 'fiddle-faddle', 'ding-dong', et 'riff raff'.

     Part II:
    No native speaker of English, would ever dally-dilly or shally-shilly on their way to a song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor would we ever walk  in a zag-zig to a saw-see, have a chat-chit while eating a Kat-Kit, or play a game of pong-ping. Even when the expression has three elements, the rule stands: bash-bosh-bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney-meeny-mo sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The Japanese  have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry leaves ) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch (‘fiddlesticks‘), a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and there’s another !). 

    Aucun anglophone ne s'amuserait à ner-traî, ou verser-tergi en tant-chan, en portant des quette-cla. Nous ne marcherions jamais non plus en zag-zig vers un cul-tape, ne serions vard-ba tout en mangeant du kat-kit ou en jouant au pong-ping. Même lorsque l'expression comporte trois éléments, la règle reste la même :  boum-bam-bim : ça ne marche pas et gram-stram-am sonne faux. On retrouve la même loi dans de nombreuses langues. Les japonais ont le beau "kasa koso" (le bruissement des feuilles sèches), tandis que les allemands pourraient parler de Quitschquatsch ("balivernes"), de "Wirrwarr" (imbroglio), ou de Krimskrams (leur version du bric-à-brac français et il y en a une autre) 

    Part III:
    We’ve all been doing this for centuries, yet the reason ablaut reduplication exists has never been fully nailed down. Sound is definitely key- when we produce an ‘i’ or ‘e’, we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ’o’ pushes it lower. This high vowel low vowel sequence produces a pleasing rhythm, even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating pirrodge for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we never need to know what we don’t know ; we just… know it ! 

    Nous le faisons tous depuis des siècles, mais la raison d'être de la réduplication ablaut n'a jamais été entièrement déterminée. Le son est sans aucun doute un élément clé -quand nous produisons un 'i' ou un 'e', nous positionnons notre langue plus haut dans notre bouche alors que le 'a' ou le 'o' la pousse plus bas. Cette séquence de voyelle haute-voyelle basse produit un rythme plaisant, même si nous le réservons principalement pour ces combinaisons ludiques -sinon, nous pourrions tous manger du pirrodge au petit-déjeuner. Par chance pour les locuteurs natifs, nous n'avons jamais besoin de savoir ce que nous ne savons pas ; ça, nous le savons !



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de maya92, postée le 31-10-2020 à 16:32:06 (S | E)
    Hello Here4u,

    Pourquoi un Anglophone ne pourrait-il pas ‘dally-dilly’ ou ne ‘zagziguera’ ? Perplexe ? la réponse repose dans une ‘législation’ non-officielle du langage. L’anglais n’a aucune législation, aucun organisme ni aucune académie ne lui dicte ses règles ou sa façon d’ évoluer. Mais parfois nous pouvons tomber sur une ’loi’ curieuse qui n’a été passée par aucune autorité formelle si ce n’est par les Anglophones eux-mêmes. Bien peu d’entre nous savent que nous suivons un ancien protocole connu sous le nom de “répétition successive”. Il impose que, dans une combinaison de mots redoublés on mette toujours le son i(comme dans ‘pit’) ou le ‘e’ (comme dans ‘ce’) en premier avant un ‘a’ ou un ‘o’ de là ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’ et ‘riffraff’ (caillera)

    Aucun Anglophone ne ‘dally-dilly’ ou ne ‘shally-shilly’ sur le chemin d’un ‘song-sing’ avec aux pieds des ‘flop-flips’. Et aucun ne ‘zagziguera’ jamais jusqu’à un ‘sawsee’, n’aura un ’chat-chit’ en mangeant un Kat-Kit tout en jouant au ‘pong-ping’. Même lorsque l’expression contient trois éléments la règle est la même : bash-bosh-bish n’y déroge pas et eeny-miney-meeny-mo semble faux. On trouve cette même règle dans de nombreuses langues. Les Japonais ont leur beau ’kasa koso’ (bruissement des feuilles mortes), alors que les Allemands parlent de ‘quitschquatsch’ (quelle blague !), Wirrwarr (fouillis) ou Krimskrams leur version du français bric-à-brac , (encore un …)

    Nous faisons tous ça depuis des siècles et cependant la raison pour laquelle cette ‘répétition successive’ existe n’a jamais été établie. La sonorité en est définitivement la clé – lorsque nous produisons un ‘i’ ou un ‘e’, nous positionnons notre langue plus haut dans la bouche tandis que pour dire un ‘a’ ou un ‘o’ nous la mettons plus bas. Grâce à cette séquence voyelle haute/voyelle basse le rythme est agréable même si elle est plutôt réservée à des associations légère sinon nous mangerions tous du ‘pirrodge’ au petit-déjeuner. Heureusement pour un locuteur natif nous n’avons jamais besoin de savoir ce que nous ne savons pas ; nous le savons, c’est tout !

    As it seems impossible to translate these ‘ablaut reduplication’ in French I’ve written a short French text trying to do the same with our ‘reduplication’ …

    Ce matin je me sentais couça-couci.Je sortis et tout en marchant clopant-clopin j’achetais une boite de Tac Tic et me dirigeais caha-cahin vers le magasin de brac-à-bric. J’ouvris la porte et la sonnette fit entendre un dong-ding sonore mais rien ne m’intéressa. Je rentrais donc en allant de là de ci et aussi par là par ci.

    Voilà c’était just for fun … Have a nice lockdown Sunday 



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de here4u, postée le 31-10-2020 à 17:57:40 (S | E)
    WOW!

    BRAVO, Maya, pour ce petit texte d'anthologie !



    Réponse : Rack your Brains and Help/80 de here4u, postée le 31-10-2020 à 18:36:42 (S | E)
    Hello, Dear Friends!

    UN IMMENSE à nos volontaires, au service du groupe entier ! Vous avez fait un excellent travail, d'autant mieux que c'était délicat et nécessitait beaucoup d'inventivité et de recherches !

    Voici un excellent exemple écrit par Maya, pour prouver, si besoin était que : "a text loses much in a translation!"

    -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:--:-:-:-:--:-:-:-

    As it seems impossible to translate these ‘ablaut reduplications’ in French I’ve written a short French text trying to do the same with our ‘reduplications’ …

    Ce matin je me sentais couça-couci. Je sortis et tout en marchant clopant-clopin, j’achetais une boite de Tac Tic et me dirigeais caha-cahin vers le magasin de brac-à-bric. J’ouvris la porte et la sonnette fit entendre un dong-ding sonore mais rien ne m’intéressa. Je rentrais donc en allant de-là de-ci et aussi par là par ci.

    -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:--:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:--:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:--:--:-


    Why would an English-speaker never dally-dilly, or walk in a zag-zig? Confused? The answer lies in an unofficial «law» of language. English has no government – no body or academy dictating its rules or development. But sometimes, we come across a curious ‘law’ that has been passed not by any formal authority, but by the speakers themselves.
    Very few of us would know that we follow an ancient protocol that goes by the technical name of ‘ablaut reduplication’. It dictates that, in any duplicating word combination, we always put the ‘i’ sound (as in ‘pit’), or the ‘e’ (as in ‘see’), first, before an ‘a’ or an ‘o’ – hence ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’, and ‘riff raff’.
    XXXXX

    1) A. Pourquoi un anglophone ne traînasserait-il jamais, ou ne marcherait-il pas en zig-zag ? Confus ? La réponse tient son origine dans une « loi » officieuse de la langue. L’anglais n’a pas d’académie linguistique ( plutôt que gouvernance) personne(no body: en deux mots!) ou académie ne dicte ses règles ou son développement. Mais parfois, nous trouvons par hasard une « loi » curieuse qui a été adoptée non pas par une autorité formelle, mais par les orateurs trop formel: utilisateurs? eux-mêmes.
    Très peu d’entre nous savons que nous suivons un ancien protocole qui porte le nom technique d’« alternance vocalique ». Il dicte que, dans toute combinaison de mots en allitérationS , nous mettons toujours le son «i » (comme dans « pit »( trou)), ou le «ee » (comme dans « see » (voir), d’abord, avant un « a» ou « o» - d’où « fiddle-faddle »(balivernes) , « ding-dong », et « riff raff (racaille)».
    CHOCO TB

    1) B. Pourquoi un anglophone ne tergiverserait-il jamais ou ne marcherait-il pas en zig-zag? Confus ? La réponse réside dans une "loi" non officielle du langage.= de la langue. L'a langue anglaise n'a pas de directive, ni de structure ou d'académie qui dicte ses règles ou son développement. Mais parfois nous rencontrons une curieuse "loi" qui a été votéeappliquée non par une autorité formelle mais par les orateurs eux-mêmes.
    Très peu d'entre nous savent que nous suivons un ancien protocole qui porte le nom technique de "réduplication" .Il dicte que dans n'importe quelle combinaison de mots répétés ,nous mettons toujours le son "i" comme dans "pit"(trou, fosse)ou le 'e' comme dans (see)d'abord devant un'a' ou un'o'- d'où fiddle-faddle (balivernes)"ding-dong" et "riff-raff"(racaille).
    MAGIE TB

    1) C. Pourquoi un anglophone ne pourrait-il pas ner-traî, marcher en zag-zig ? Bonne idée ! Un peu perdu ? La réponse se trouve dans une "loi" non officielle de la langue. L'anglais n'as pas de gouvernement - aucun organisme ou académie ne dictant ses règles ou son développement. Mais quelquefois, nous rencontrons une curieuse "loi" qui a été adoptée non pas par une autorité officielle mais par les locuteurs eux-mêmes. Très peu d'entre nous savent que nous suivons un protocole ancien qui est connu sous le nom technique de réduplication partielle à alternance vocalique. Elle impose que, dans toute combinaison de mots qui se répète, nous mettions toujours le son 'i' (comme dans 'pit') ou le 'e' (comme dans 'see') en premier, avant un 'a' ou un 'o' -d'où 'fiddle-faddle', 'ding-dong', et 'riff raff'. MAXWELL

    1) D. Pourquoi un Anglophone ne pourrait-il pas ‘dally-dilly’ ou ne ‘zagziguera’ -t-il pas ? Perplexe ? la réponse repose dans une ‘législation’ non-officielle du langage. L’anglais n’a aucune législation, aucun organisme ni aucune académie ne lui dicte ses règles ou sa façon d’ évoluer. Mais parfois nous pouvons tomber sur une ’loi’ curieuse qui n’a été passée par aucune autorité formelle si ce n’est par les Anglophones eux-mêmes. Bien peu d’entre nous savent que nous suivons un ancien protocole connu sous le nom de “répétition successive”. Il impose que, dans une combinaison de mots redoublés on mette toujours le son i(comme dans ‘pit’) ou le ‘e’ (comme dans ‘ce’) en premier avant un ‘a’ ou un ‘o’ de là ‘fiddle-faddle’, ‘ding-dong’ et ‘riffraff’ (caillera) MAYA



    No native speaker of English, would ever dally-dilly or shally-shilly on their way to a song-sing while wearing flop-flips. Nor would we ever walk in a zag-zig to a saw-see, have a chat-chit while eating a Kat-Kit, or play a game of pong-ping. Even when the expression has three elements, the rule stands: bash-bosh-bish just doesn’t cut it, and eeny-miney-meeny-mo sounds all wrong. The same law is found in many languages. The Japanese have the beautiful ‘kasa koso’ (the rustling sound of dry leaves) while the Germans might speak of Quitschquatsch ('fiddlesticks'), a Wirrwarr (muddle), or of Krimskrams (their version of the French bric-a-brac- and there’s another!).

    2) A. Aucun locuteur natif en anglais, ne serait jamais dally-dilly (traînasserait) ou shilly-shilly (hésiterait) sur son chemin avec une singsong (voix chantante) tout en portant des flop-flips (tongS). Pas plus que nous ne marcherions jamais en zag-zig (zigzag) vers un (tape-cul), avoir des chat-chit (bavardages) tout en mangeant un Kat-Kit (kitkat), ou jouer à un jeu de pong-ping (ping pong). Même lorsque l’ expression a trois éléments, on maintient la règle : bash-bosh-bish juste ne se coupe pas, et eeny-miney-meeny-mo (comptine enfantine ) sonne tout aussi faux. La même loi se trouve dans de nombreuses langues. Les Japonais ont le beau 'kasa koso' (le bruissement craquant des feuilles sèches) tandis que les Allemands pourraient parler de Quitschquatsch (balivernes), un Wirrwarr (confusion), ou de Krimskrams (babioles) (leur version du Français bric-à-brac- et il y en a une autre!). CHOCO

    2) B. Aucun anglophone ne s'amuserait à ner-traî, ou verser-tergi en tant-chan, en portant des quette-cla. Nous ne marcherions jamais non plus en zag-zig vers un cul-tape, ne serions vard-ba tout en mangeant du kat-kit ou en jouant au pong-ping. Même lorsque l'expression comporte trois éléments, la règle reste la même : boum-bam-bim : ça ne marche pas et gram-stram-am sonne faux. On retrouve la même loi dans de nombreuses langues. Les japonais ont le beau "kasa koso" (le bruissement des feuilles sèches), tandis que les allemands pourraient parler de Quitschquatsch ("balivernes"), de "Wirrwarr" (imbroglio), ou de Krimskrams (leur version du bric-à-brac français et il y en a une autre) MAXWELL

    2) C. Aucun Anglophone ne ‘dally-dilly’ ou ne ‘shally-shilly’ sur le chemin d’un ‘song-sing’ avec aux pieds des ‘flop-flips’. Et aucun ne ‘zagziguera’ jamais jusqu’à un ‘sawsee’, n’aura un ’chat-chit’ en mangeant un Kat-Kit tout en jouant au ‘pong-ping’. Même lorsque l’expression contient trois éléments la règle est la même : bash-bosh-bish n’y déroge pas et eeny-miney-meeny-mo semble faux. On trouve cette même règle dans de nombreuses langues. Les Japonais ont leur beau ’kasa koso’ (bruissement des feuilles mortes), alors que les Allemands parlent de ‘quitschquatsch’ (quelle blague !), Wirrwarr (fouillis) ou Krimskrams leur version du français bric-à-brac , (encore un …) MAYA



    We’ve all been doing this for centuries, yet the reason ablaut reduplication exists has never been fully nailed down. Sound is definitely key- when we produce an 'i' or 'e', we position our tongue higher in our mouth, whereas the ‘a’ or ’o’ pushes it lower. This high vowel low vowel sequence produces a pleasing rhythm, even if it’s one we reserve mostly for these playful combinations – otherwise we might all be eating pirrodge for breakfast. Luckily for native speakers – we never need to know what we don’t know; we just… know it!

    3) A. Nous avons tous fait faisons tous cela pendantdepuis des siècles, mais la raison pour laquelle l’alternance vocalique existe n’a jamais été entièrement résolue. Le son est définitivement la clé- lorsque nous produisons un «i » ou «ee », nous positionnons notre langue plus haut dans notre bouche, tandis que le « a» ou « o» la place plus basse. Cette séquence de voyelles basses hautes produit un rythme agréable, même si c’est celui que nous réservons surtout pour ces combinaisons ludiques - sinon nous mangerions tous du pirrodge (porridge) pour le petit déjeuner. Heureusement pour les locuteurs natifs - nous avons toujours besoin de savoir ce que nous ne savons pas; nous venons de ... le savoir! CHOCO (dommage pour la toute fin ...)

    3) B. Nous le faisons tous depuis des siècles, mais la raison d'être de la réduplication ablaut n'a jamais été entièrement déterminée. Le son est sans aucun doute un élément clé -quand nous produisons un 'i' ou un 'e', nous positionnons notre langue plus haut dans notre bouche alors que le 'a' ou le 'o' la pousse plus bas. Cette séquence de voyelle haute-voyelle basse produit un rythme plaisant, même si nous le réservons principalement pour ces combinaisons ludiques -sinon, nous pourrions tous manger du pirrodge au petit-déjeuner. Par chance pour les locuteurs natifs, nous n'avons jamais besoin de savoir ce que nous ne savons pas ; ça, nous le savons ! MAXWELL

    3) C. Nous faisons tous ça depuis des siècles et cependant la raison pour laquelle cette ‘répétition successive’ existe n’a jamais été établie. La sonorité en est définitivement la clé – lorsque nous produisons un ‘i’ ou un ‘e’, nous positionnons notre langue plus haut dans la bouche tandis que pour dire un ‘a’ ou un ‘o’ nous la mettons plus bas. Grâce à cette séquence voyelle haute/voyelle basse le rythme est agréable même si elle est plutôt réservée à des associations légèreS sinon nous mangerions tous du ‘pirrodge’ au petit-déjeuner. Heureusement pour un locuteur natif nous n’avons jamais besoin de savoir ce que nous ne savons pas ; nous le savons, c’est tout ! MAYA

    Bravo à tous pour cette recherche et vos très bons résultats, bravo encore plus à nos volontaires pour ce "petit plus" qui est énorme !




    [POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


    Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum










    Partager : Facebook / Twitter / ... 


    > INDISPENSABLES : TESTEZ VOTRE NIVEAU | GUIDE DE TRAVAIL | NOS MEILLEURES FICHES | Les fiches les plus populaires | Une leçon par email par semaine | Aide/Contact

    > COURS ET EXERCICES : Abréviations | Accords | Adjectifs | Adverbes | Alphabet | Animaux | Argent | Argot | Articles | Audio | Auxiliaires | Chanson | Communication | Comparatifs/Superlatifs | Composés | Conditionnel | Confusions | Conjonctions | Connecteurs | Contes | Contraires | Corps | Couleurs | Courrier | Cours | Dates | Dialogues | Dictées | Décrire | Démonstratifs | Ecole | Etre | Exclamations | Famille | Faux amis | Français Langue Etrangère / Langue Seconde |Films | Formation | Futur | Fêtes | Genre | Goûts | Grammaire | Grands débutants | Guide | Géographie | Heure | Homonymes | Impersonnel | Infinitif | Internet | Inversion | Jeux | Journaux | Lettre manquante | Littérature | Magasin | Maison | Majuscules | Maladies | Mots | Mouvement | Musique | Mélanges | Méthodologie | Métiers | Météo | Nature | Nombres | Noms | Nourriture | Négations | Opinion | Ordres | Orthographe | Participes | Particules | Passif | Passé | Pays | Pluriel | Politesse | Ponctuation | Possession | Poèmes | Pronominaux | Pronoms | Prononciation | Proverbes | Prépositions | Présent | Présenter | Quantité | Question | Relatives | Sports | Style direct | Subjonctif | Subordonnées | Synonymes | Temps | Tests de niveau | Tous/Tout | Traductions | Travail | Téléphone | Vidéo | Vie quotidienne | Villes | Voitures | Voyages | Vêtements

    > NOS AUTRES SITES GRATUITS : Cours mathématiques | Cours d'espagnol | Cours d'allemand | Cours de français | Cours de maths | Outils utiles | Bac d'anglais | Learn French | Learn English | Créez des exercices

    > INFORMATIONS : Copyright - En savoir plus, Aide, Contactez-nous [Conditions d'utilisation] [Conseils de sécurité] [Plan du site] Reproductions et traductions interdites sur tout support (voir conditions) | Contenu des sites déposé chaque semaine chez un huissier de justice | Mentions légales / Vie privée / Cookies.
    | Cours et exercices de français 100% gratuits, hors abonnement internet auprès d'un fournisseur d'accès.